Find the Job - Job Search News

Tuning Into a Good Deal

WSJ Careers - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 21:39
From haircuts to dental cleanings, there are plenty of cheap services supplied by students in New York. At Floating Piano Factory, apprentice piano tunings start at $60—about half the typical rate.

High Salaries Haunt Some Job Hunters

WSJ Careers - Fri, 02/05/2016 - 10:14
Recruiters increasingly are asking job candidates about pay history early in the hiring process, putting high earners at risk of being priced out of contention.

Family Leave Hits the Campaign Trail

WSJ Careers - Thu, 02/04/2016 - 22:36
Presidential candidates are wrestling over a basic workforce question: Should employees get paid time off to tend to newborn children, an acute illness or an ailing parent?

Do Elite Colleges Lead to Higher Salaries? Only for Some Professions

WSJ Careers - Wed, 02/03/2016 - 12:47
A diploma from a highly selective college means higher pay in certain fields. In others, it makes almost no difference at all.

Your Job- Bigger, Better, More

Lisa Kaye - Sun, 01/31/2016 - 15:12

When it comes to your career the first step in getting what you want is to know what you want. It may seem like just realizing it’s time for a change is all you need. Wrong. Your career can magically take shape only if you are absolutely clear on all points. You get what you ask for even if you are not sure what that is. If your career has been smooth sailing maybe you were in the right place at the right time. If you seem to struggle against the tide, then it may be time to rethink your priorities and put out only that which you want to take in.

Getting clear doesn’t mean that you know you need a change. Getting clear means you know exactly what you are looking for when it comes to making a move. Like looking for a house, a spouse or a car, the specific details you provide helps you to materialize what you want in a way no one else can predict. There is a reason why certain job offers come effortlessly and others seem to disappear as fast they show up. You may wrack your brain over the job that eludes you or maybe you are smarter at the process than you give yourself credit?

Just because the job you want suddenly no longer wants you seems a sure sign that something in YOU has shifted. Getting clear on knowing what that that is means you are eliminating what you don’t want and making room for something new. If you are really honest with yourself you will know exactly what feels right even though you may think you want a particular job. Here is an idea from a very successful business professional who has manifested exactly the career she’s wanted by following her simple list of “asks”:

  1. Bigger: The role I want needs to include a global component. Something that stretches me to learn a new language, deal with new cultures and travel the world. I want to be able to have an international component and learn my skills in a new way affecting a larger scope of responsibility in a diverse and fascinating work environment.
  2. Better: I want better professional connections with people and to work within innovative and inspiring teams. I want to create long-lasting relationships that extend beyond the workplace- I want to be part of a “work family.” I want to better utilize my talents in helping others and to work collaboratively, creatively and consciously towards my career goals.
  3. More:  I want a role where my contributions are rewarded handsomely. I want more money, more equity, more responsibility and more long-term rewards that help me to pay off my mortgage, my credit debt and to help save more for the future for long term financial stability and success.

When you truly know what you want and are very specific about your intentions, doors will open up for you to allow only those opportunities that will align with your goals. You may not believe that it can work that way, but there is no harm in trying it out and spending some quiet time making your “Bigger, Better, More” list of asks and wants. If you don’t know what you want, why do you think anyone else will? You can continue to throw caution to the wind and accept any job offer that seems to come along or seems right for the moment. Or you can really spend time perfecting your career recipe and know what you really want so you can say “Yes” when it does finally come along!

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Your Job- Bigger, Better, More

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

U.S. Union Membership Rate Held Steady in 2015

WSJ Careers - Thu, 01/28/2016 - 20:54
The rate of union membership in the U.S. held steady last year, with slight overall gains in union membership rosters outweighed by the rising ranks of nonunion workers.

Companies Find Tech Talent In Robust Freelance Market

WSJ Careers - Wed, 01/27/2016 - 22:17
A new class of private marketplace that connects software developers with corporations eager to hire people with the latest tech skills has popped up in Silicon Valley and other markets that attract young, freelance coders.

Companies Ponder a Rating of Workers' Health

WSJ Careers - Wed, 01/27/2016 - 00:01
A group of employers, including International Business Machines, PepsiCo and Johnson & Johnson, are weighing how to publicly report—and measure—the health of their workforce.

Reading a Blitz Is Easy. Social Networking, Not So Much

WSJ Careers - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:32
Despite all the intricate blocking schemes and blitz packages NFL players must learn, one thing still vexes many of them off the field: how best to utilize their LinkedIn accounts.

Bosses: Are You Too Gritty for Your Own Good?

WSJ Careers - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 21:19
Some business leaders may be too gritty. Long a hallmark of overachievers, grit is trendy nowadays—but excessive grittiness can hurt your career.

Companies Urge Retiring Workers to Leave Their Money Behind

WSJ Careers - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 22:33
Companies are increasingly urging employees to keep their nest eggs in their corporate 401(k) plans when they change jobs.

Hello, Can You Hear Me?

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 14:57

When it comes to asking for what you want do you feel like no one is listening? You may be looking for your next big assignment, searching endlessly for a new job, or pitching a promotion at work all to have your efforts fall on deaf ears. When your career outreach feels like dead air and you find yourself asking, “Can you hear me now?” it’s time to revisit your strategy and find a better way to engage.

  1. Overcoming Dead Air: No one likes to feel they are being ignored. When you begin to understand that it’s not deliberate or personal you might be able to find a way to maneuver around the silence. Knowing when not to be a pest means you are giving it that good college try. Follow up skills are the most important skill you can develop when you are networking, negotiating or just plain trying to engage a response.
  2. Knock 3 Times … When it comes to following up, there is a magic number and that is 3. The first attempt is either in the form of an introduction call or email, a follow up thank you or a request for a meeting. The second attempt is to make sure they got the first attempt and your follow up is in the form of a “Hey did you get my first request?” The third attempt is critical, a phone call, email or in person or any other direct way to connect with the person is your best shot at moving the request forward. If you are unsuccessful, wait at least 3 weeks and try the knock 3 times strategy until you get a response. Even if the response is “Thanks but no thanks,” it’s something and you know when to move on.
  3. “Hello?” You might feel like you are caught in the Adele song, but knowing when to keep at it or when it’s time to give up and move on is critical in how you develop your strategy. Your career is a work in progress whether you are in the middle of a negotiation or you are trying to get someone’s attention about a job opportunity. If you don’t follow your instincts about timing and what is right for you, you will wind up wasting a lot of time.

Finding the right opportunity even if it means starting over again in order to move ahead is all you may need to jumpstart your job search. You are not a failure if no one is calling you back. Believe it or not, there maybe a very good reason why something you are focusing on does not come through for you when you think it should. Even if you don’t believe in divine intervention, rejection of any kind keeps you sharp and on your toes and helps you to weed out the good opportunities from the bad. You may think if you scream “Hello!” loud enough someone is likely to listen. Maybe so but casting the widest net possible and following up and every likely lead may get you further along than you think.

 

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Hello, Can You Hear Me?

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

ESPN's John Skipper Plays Offense on Cable Cord-Cutting

WSJ Careers - Tue, 01/19/2016 - 21:29
In an interview, John Skipper dismissed the narrative that something fundamental is amiss at ESPN. He talked about the company’s plans to distribute more content online to reach cord-cutters and addressed criticism.

2016 Your Job Makeover

Lisa Kaye - Sun, 01/17/2016 - 12:15

Well there is no getting around the idea of pulling together a plan for the New Year whether you call it a resolution, a wish list or a job makeover. We all need a little motivation sometimes even a big shove to get things moving in the right direction. Procrastination coming out of the holiday haze is to be expected but knowing when it’s time to kick into high gear is your next step if you want to get going on checking off items from your list.

When it comes to figuring out what your job makeover should include, here’s a list of the top things we believe are important considerations when making over any job whether you love it or you hate it:

  1. Tweaking Your Hair: Whether you like the way your hair looks or not starting from the top down to get the new you in shape for the new job interview is not a bad idea. Parting your hair a new way, changing the color or going for a drastic cut will help you look at you in a new light and give you the self-confidence to go for something different and more noticeable. Changing your appearance in a positive way helps you feel better about your choices.
  2. Changing Your Clothes: A change of jobs is like a change of clothes, it needs to fit right in order for you to feel comfortable. Investing in a good wardrobe even if it’s a new jacket, a pair of shoes or a new dress is a good way to begin the investment in yourself even if you have no intention of accepting a new job offer. Taking pride in your appearance is a good first step in taking pride in what you choose to do for a living.
  3. Rewriting Your Resume: You might need to invest in having someone help you to fine tune your resume, but making even minor changes, like changing the font size, or format or including hobbies or new skills you’ve learned will help keep you stay current and ready for when someone does ask to see your credentials.
  4. Updating Your Profile: If you are on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Vimeo, or any social networking site that is personal or professional it’s time to take a new look at what you have been posting. Keeping it fresh and professional when you are about to embark on looking for a new job may mean you take down the party photos of you getting trashed at New Years or your wild holiday vacation shots on Instagram. Keeping a consistent, focused and professional image means not just in your persona but in your online profile as well.
  5. Contacting Your References: Reconnecting with folks to look for a job is one thing, but what about those forgotten few you list regularly as a reference-when was the last time you reached out to one of them? It’s nice to network but making sure you are connected to the people who worked with you in the past is equally as important. Do they know what you have been up to? What would they say about you now? Keeping your connections current even if you have not worked with someone in awhile is a must if you want a good recommendation.
  6. Defining Your Goals: It’s nice to wish for what you want but how many of you actually “ask” for what you want? Being clear on things like work life balance, money, opportunity, commute and office environment BEFORE you accept a job offer will help you from many sleepless nights wondering how you could have been so wrong about making a career change.
  7. Being Subtle But Savvy: Telling your closest friends that you are on the job market after several rounds of martinis may have seemed the right thing to do but being quiet and reserved about your job search may be the more savvy approach especially if your friends also happen to be your co-workers. Keeping your cool and adopting a more subtle approach to how you are moving ahead is a smart strategy especially if you are confidentially looking to make a career change.
  8. Asking For Help: You may be a very independent person and have no problem making decisions on your own. You may even pride in yourself on your ability to be decisive and smart. However, asking for help every now and again and “putting it out there” to your trusted and confidential network is not a bad strategy when you are thinking about a change and how best to approach any new career opportunities.
  9. Being Self-Supportive: Making a career change no matter how subtle is not always easy. You have to be kind not only to the folks you are interviewing with and those that are helping you along the way but you also need to be most kind to yourself. Giving yourself permission to take a break from a rigorous interview schedule does not mean you are a flake or need to give up if you have not landed a job offer in record time. Being your own best ally in your support of change is the best way you can makeover any career even one you love.

You must remember that change no matter how small does not happen over night and for it to really stick you need to maintain a consistent focus on the prize in sight. Your job makeover is most reliant on your ability to change and more importantly to be ready for the change. Timing is everything and forcing yourself when you are not ready mentally or emotionally will not make your progress move any faster.

Your 2015 job makeover is waiting for you to be ready and the changes you will make will be well worth the wait if you stay the course and take one job step at a time.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: 2016 Your Job Makeover

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Open Salaries: the Good, the Bad and the Awkward

WSJ Careers - Sat, 01/16/2016 - 07:41
Companies’ open-pay policies bring inequities out in the open, prompting awkward conversations among employees and managers about who is making too little or too much.

Goldman Plans to Cut Up to 10% of Fixed-Income Traders, Salespeople

WSJ Careers - Thu, 01/14/2016 - 09:03
Goldman Sachs is planning to cut up to 10% of its fixed-income traders and salespeople later this quarter, a steeper-than-usual pruning of the firm’s least-productive employees.

Asking For Help

Lisa Kaye - Mon, 01/11/2016 - 10:31

There are times in life when you might think it’s okay to ask for help. Whether you are moving, clearing out your house, or taking care of a sick child or parent, you may feel asking a friend for a helping hand is both normal and expected. But when it comes to your job search, how often do you ask for help? Some people think asking for help with a job introduction is like asking for a favor. It’s neither polite or in good form. What you don’t realize is that asking for help with your job search is not necessarily a bad thing and should be encouraged no matter where you are in your career.

Asking for help is not like begging. No one is expecting to help someone who cannot help him or herself. If you are starting out in your career but have little connections in an industry you want to break into, then ask those around you for help. Like with everything there is a right way and a wrong way to ask for help before someone starts to think you may be taking advantage of the relationship.

Here are a few ways you can consider asking for help that won’t make you seem like a poor relation or a job intruder!

  1. I saw you have a connection on LinkedIn …: Doing your research about a job or a contact that you are interested in pursuing shows that you are not leveraging a particular relationship but are canvassing the entire universe of possibilities. If you are looking for an in with a company or an introduction to an individual, asking someone who might know this person is not an intrusion but smart and is a professional way to approach the subject.
  2. I read about your background … Doing research on the person you are asking help from is a smart way to not “assume” you know anything about that person, but also shows you are interested and grateful for any knowledge, experience or insights they might choose to share with you about the company or the position you are interested in pursuing.
  3. What do you think are good companies to work for … Asking for help can also mean, asking for someone’s advice and counsel when you are considering your next step or would like another person’s opinion. Assuming you have all the answers and just want someone to pull a favor for you is not going to gain you any extra points if you are trying to ingratiate yourself and need someone to help you make a connection. Showing some interest in that person shows you care and are respecting that person’s time and commitment to helping you with your request.
  4. I’d like to run something by you…. Asking for help means you are asking for permission on whether this individual is open to assisting you? Don’t assume that just because you’ve known the person for a long time or are a distant relation that they are obliged to assist you. When you ask for assistance you are putting yourself out there and are somewhat vulnerable. You might as well approach the request with a little dignity and respect and learn to be humble about the process in order for someone to feel good about wanting to help you with your job search.
  5. Not everyone is in a position to offer assistance … When you ask do not expect everyone to jump at the chance to help you. It’s okay if someone can’t help you for whatever reason they have or have not given you. Don’t take it personally, just be gracious and ask them if they can think of anyone else who might be able to assist you? Just because someone says, “No” does not mean they can’t be helpful in referring you to someone else who might be able to help. Don’t hold a grudge or become disenchanted, asking for help is a gift not a right.

When you are most sincere about your intentions and really have a thoughtful and respectful approach to asking for someone’s help, don’t be surprised at the overwhelming response you may receive. Rejection may be part of the process, but if you don’t ask, you may never receive the help you truly need.

Looking for a job?  Find us at www.greenlightjobs.com

Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/lisakayeglj

Follow greenlightjobs on Twitter http://twitter.com/greenlightjobs

And, on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/pub/2/abb/50

 

 

Copyright © 2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting - The Career Rebel
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Original article: Asking For Help

©2016 Lisa Kaye - HR & Business Consulting. All Rights Reserved.

Brokerages Brace for a Wave of Departures

WSJ Careers - Sat, 01/09/2016 - 00:27
Thousands of stockbrokers will turn free agent this year as long-running retention deals expire. That is prompting brokerage firms to take steps to stymie their departures and keep clients from moving with them if they do go.

'It's Just a Mess': China Turmoil Leaves Traders Gasping for Air

WSJ Careers - Fri, 01/08/2016 - 21:09
China’s topsy-turvy week—marked by plummeting stocks, trading halts and a whipsawing yuan—blindsided traders in Hong Kong and spread a New Year chill across markets world-wide.

New Year, New Job? Could Be Tricky

WSJ Careers - Fri, 01/08/2016 - 11:59
Finding a new job is a perennial New Year’s resolution, so it’s no surprise the first week in January is a busy one on job-search websites. But as with many resolutions, it often can take a while to pick up steam.

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